Kenya to know its fate on the escalating maritime border conflict with Somalia today

Kenya-Somalia maritime row ruling will take place today at the International Court of Justice (ICJ).

At 1300 GMT, a complete bench of 15 judges, chaired by US judge Joan Donoghue, will deliver the judgment at The Hague’s Peace Palace.

Somalia had sued Kenya at the Hague-based court for what it said was unlawful operations in its maritime territory along the Indian Ocean.

Somalia believes that the 160 000 square kilometres triangle should follow the southeasterly path of the country’s land border.

In contrast, Kenya claims that the border should take a 45-degree bend at the shoreline and follow a latitudinal line.

The court heard the case despite protests from Kenya. Kenya withdrew from the lawsuit accusing the court of business.

Last week, Kenya’s Foreign Affairs Principal, Secretary Amb Macharia Kamau, announced that the country will not recognize the ruling saying ICJ lacks jurisdiction to determine the case.

Ambassador Macharia criticized ICJ for ignoring a 2009 agreement between the two nations on how to resolve the row amicably.

He also slammed the court for ignoring a 1965 reservation that barred comparable cases from its authority.

“The delivery of the Judgment will be the culmination of a flawed judicial process that Kenya has had reservations with, and withdrawn from, on account not just of its obvious and inherent bias but also of its unsuitability to resolve the dispute at hand,” said Amb. Macharia.

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